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that this is not hand-pick, not. -screened. montana was a closely contested states in the general election, so it is possible that there will be more skeptics, more confrontational questions. but when push comes to shove, most americans are not faced-to- face confrontational with their president. it does not happen. it is part of the with our relationship to the presidency works. so there may be skeptics, but mainly, it will be deferential and polite because that is how they always happen. shepard: they have been running it up. of the trawlers off the church. -- the vitriol is off the charts. >> yes, and max bacchus -- john tester, the state has been there. in statewide elections, it was very hard fought, and that was a bit unusual. so they could be a bit more sympathetic to the democratic line of argumentation. even by historical standards, it might not be as revved up or vociferous or whatever you might use it on this topic. no matter what the question. shepard: it appears clear to me, and correct me if i'm wrong, that the white house was caught after guard by the level of resistance here. a
to arrive in montana for a town hall event, ready to challenge what he calls myths about his health care reform effort. white house officials tell me prospects are changing right now, but not in the way you think. i'll talk with white house health care czar about that, about president obama's deal with companies and the strategy after the august recess. >>> have the town hall gathering forced them to back away from the death panels? are republicans like sarah palin winning or losing? and does the president still have the communications mojo to make this work. i'll talk with paul krugman. >>> good day. i'm john harwood of cnbc and "the new york times." this is "the new york times special edition." on the front page this hour, president obama expected to arrive any moment in montana. at the end of this hour, he'll be holding his second town hall meeting on health care this week. you can see it here on msnbc. he'll hold another one tomorrow in colorado. he's trying once again to sell his plan to the people concerned about big government and price tags. no better place for that than big sky
know, growing up here in montana, wlerned values like hard work and common sense, also the difference between right and wrong. and it's just plain wrong for insurance companies to devalue coverage when you get sick and need it the most. and it's just plain wrong for insurance companies to deny people of care because of preexisting conditions. and that's why we're working so hard to craft a common sense plan that is right for our state and right for america. here in montana, we also know the value of an honest word. and let me tell you, there's plenty of dishonesty out there about what health care reform will or will not do. now, you've all seen the tv show, "myth busters," right? well, i've been going around the state busting myths about health care. whether it's bogus information about rationing care, cutting benefits for seniors or -- doctor and patient relationship, these outrageous myths are being questioned -- >> it appears that we're returning into technical problems at this town hall meeting in montana. it's gallatin field airport hangar. david schuster is still with me, but in
to turn to the president now. he is on his way to montana for another health care town hall. why montana? is there an expectation for a lively debate at this town hall? >> montana is a historical red state. there might be a bit more of an opportunity for controversy. on tuesday in portsmouth, new hampshire, he solicited more skeptical questions. we will see if that plays out. montana is also the home of max baucus. that committee will be the center of gravity. when congress comes back in the middle of september, the white house has set this deadline for the committee. if it does not, the white house has indicated, it might proceed strictly on its own without the -- without republicans on board. max baucus is a central figure in this legislative drama. rick: we want to hear from you if you have received an unsolicited email from the white house. tell us about it. for moron this, we have a couple of great guests. we're also joined by an editor for "the national review." everybody hates chain letters. >> particularly, if they are coming from the white house. rick: what do you make all of th
. he was all hat and plenty of cattle. the governor of montana will join me in just a moment. plus, the dumber than joe the plumber crazies are ratcheting up the madness. congressman adam schiff, he drew a crowd of 3,000 people to his town hall. he'll join me to talk about it at the bottom of the hour, what he ran into. >>> the newster's got a six-point battle plan for caribou barbie. newt, i got one for you too, number seven. sarah, stop lying to people about how the death panel's going to be wiping out the senior citizen population in america. stephen a. smith is in the houston night. the national football league and the philadelphia eagles a have decided to give michael vick a second chance. are you ready to give michael vick a second chance? get your cell phones out right now and text "a" for yes and "b" for no to 622639. we'll have a big discussion on this tonight. all that, and of course the drugster is back in "psycho talk." "daily show" co-creator lizz winstead weighs in on the edwards baby daddy drama. it will be a dandy. >>> first tonight's "op ed." all right, the preside
takes his health care message to montana. remember, there was little drama during his last health care town hall. this time, he is in historical republican territory and people might have hard questions. >> why is it that you change your strategy? >> how can we be assured? >> what would happen? >> you cannot tell us how you will pay for it. shepard: how well did the president do at convincing critics? the president did hear from a least a couple of as critics today. he took questions for half an hour in montana, don't you know? the crowd was expected to be tougher than the last town hall in new hampshire. montana has gone republican in nine of the last 10 presidential elections. that area is a bit more purple and the questions were not very hard-hitting until one man identified himself as a proud member of the national rifle association. he wanted to know how we are going to cover the cost of all of this. >> you cannot tell us how you will pay for this. you are saving here, over there, take a little money here, but you have no money. the only way you will get the money is to raise taxe
at a health care town hall meeting in montana, followed by a conversation with howard dean on health care. >> three days of peace, love, and music. 40 years ago, a half-million people gathered for woodstock. saturday, the co-founder takes us behind the scenes at 9:00 p.m. eastern. radio talk-show executive brian jennings on the new fairness doctrine, why is a bad idea, and alternatives to censure sai -- century ship. >> now a convention of on-line activists that organizers called the rightonline conference. it is a two-day gathering to counter the netroots nation gathering also this week. this is about an hour. >> in 1824, thomas jefferson surmised that the country had more machinery than was necessary. with nearly five trillion dollars in debt, massive government and titles, and the budget deficit approaching $2 trillion, his words have never been more true. americans for prosperity foundation plays a crucial role in reversing this government tide. together, informed americans can stop government takeovers. together, informed americans can stand for common sense. together, informed ameri
in a second. we understand this town hall meeting in montana today for president obama could be a little more rowdy, as you put it on politico than the new hampshire one. why? >> willie, when "morning joe" talks, the white house perks up, if we can continue our talk analogies here. >> sure. >> what did joe, what did chuck todd, what did pat buchanan say yesterday? they said the president would have been better off at that town hall this week if the president had answereded critics, had taken tough questions. it's not like president obama would be thrown off his script by some dude standing up in a town hall. so for this afternoon's montana edition, the white house gave out their tickets a little differently. instead of giving the tickets to supporters or more care-free controlled, they went to two town halls in montana and gave them out on a first served -- first curve -- that will ultimately be the question. first come first served basis so it may be a little more tougher questioning this time for colorado. in a day or two the president will go back to the white house method of ticketing. 1,
hall meeting today in belgrade, montana, according to the associated press, as many as 500 protesters are expected to rally outside the event which is taking place in an airport hangar. live coverage starts at 3:00 p.m. eastern on c-span2. conservative lawyers and activists are meeting in pittsburgh tonight for the second annual rite on-line conference. keynote speaker is former congressman pat toomey who is running for the senate in pennsylvania. coverage on c-span starts at 7:40 eastern. tonight on book tv a conversation with author christopher buckley, the son of william f. buckley jr. and his latest book is a memoir called losing mom and pop. book tv's index starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span2. >> the newest supreme court justice, sonia sotomayor, attended a white house reception with president obama. we will show it as part of c-span's america and the courts saturday at 7:00 p.m. eastern. >> this fall, and to the home to america's highest court, from the grand public places to those only accessible to the 9 justices, the supreme court, coming the first sunday in october on c-s
steps back to the fray. he's headed to montana for another meeting on health care reform. correspondents are fanned out across the nation tracking every side of the debate. >>> we begin with major developments in the deadly midair crash over the hudson river. for this morning, for the first time, we're seeing the moment of impact. the tragic collision caught on home video by an italian tourist and obtained by nbc news. the images offer incredible insight to what went wrong. a warning that some of you will find the images incredibly difficult to watch. oh, my god. oh, my god. >> nine people die in that crash. when you slow down the footage, you can see the aircraft attempting to turn and climb at the last second only to clip the helicopter with its right wing. this morning, nearly a week after the crash, the faa is taking a very close look at two air traffic controllers on duty that day. our susan candiotti has been working the story all night. she joins us now. a couple of people are in serious trouble here with the faa? >> right, john. one employee wasn't even in the building where he w
holding a town hall meeting this afternoon on health care reform outside bozeman, montana. he's expected to talk about a part of the plan that's designed to prevent insurance companies from dropping or limiting coverage for people with serious illnesses. >>> many of you have been asking for more information really, so many questions about the health care reform. there is one central place where you can find answers now. go to cnn.com/healthcare. there you will find coverage of the town halls including how to find one near you. you can upload your town hall i report and there's also information on the leading overhaul plans, the sticking points, the key players working to shape health care legislation. i know a lot of it is very confusing and seems con volume late -- con v. >>> an armed man got a beat down. the suspect walks in pointing his weapon at the owner's wife. the husband, look at him go, tackles him from behind, wrestles him out the door. they actually fought for ten minutes before police got there. >> i was thinking maybe something bad happen. my mother called at home and she sa
know, a lot of people talk about max bachus. max bachus pays attention to what people say in montana. he does. there's been single payors in his state. and this republican force is going to die. when grassley said the other day he pretty much admitted this was a farce, chairman baucus knows he has to get a bill out of this committee and if he only has democrats to work with, guess what the majority democrats on his committee favor a political option. if he's going to get a bill out of this committee with zero republican boats it's going to have to have a public option in the senate finance bill; otherwise, there isn't going to be a bill, right? and he knows there has to be a bill. so it matters what you say. it's one of the reasons i've been very careful not to criticize individual senators. i don't mind talking about their views because at the end, i think we're going to get almost every democratic senator. almost every one because there's not going to be any republicans. they're not going to be interested in forming the bill and, therefore, the democratic caucus is going to have a
to montana later today holding the second of three town halls this week to sell and defend his health care reform plan. the president getting support from former president bill clinton, who came to his defense on thursday saying republicans are promoting fear in the health care fight. >>> senior white house correspondent jake tapper has more for us this morning. good morning, jake. >> reporter: good morning, robin. well, that's right. this montana town hall meeting could prove to be a tougher crowd than the friendly audience that the president faced in new hampshire. for one, montana is a red state that senator john mccain won last fall and, two, the ticks were first come first serve so the president may be feeling the heat just as members of congress have been. >> the most danger to the most people is sticking with the status quo. it is bankrupting america, making families insecure and undermining the future of the country. >> reporter: no stranger to a health care debate former president bill clinton stepped into battle last night blaming republicans for the frenzied town hall sweeping t
in a conservative suburb of montana. it's expected to draw angry protesters just like those who have disrupted town hall meetings held by members of congress. the president will focus on a provision of the healthcare plan that would prevent insurance companies from dropping or limit coverage for those who become seriously ill. >> he felt very satisfied with what happened in new hampshire. he was able to address concerns that people had. i think he was able to take on, as i said, the misconceptions that have been out there in the legislation. so i think, he feels like we have made progress. >> organizers say they expect a turn out of about 500 people. >>> stay tuned to fox 45 morning news for continuing coverage of president obama's town hall meeting. we will have the latest coming up in a live report from washington later this hour. >>> eunice kennedy shriver will be laid to rest today. an invitation only funeral mass is scheduled at a catholic church in massachusetts. vice president joe biden is expected to join the kennedy family and friends to bid a farewell. the sister of john ed kennedy and ed
expect or what can we expect from the crowd in montana? >> we are hearing that outside this airport hangar there will be demonstrations. a local tea party group predicts hundreds rallying against this legislation but there are at least one group supporting healthcare reform that will be there. in new hampshire outside there was a little bit of a rally but inside a more sympathetic crowd than we have seen at the confrontational town halls. the white house said nobody was preselected, that not all town halls are screaming matches. tuesday in new hampshire this was done by an onstar hotline lottery. today it is a line-up of first-come, first-served so we expect the dynamic could be different. as you mentioned senator max baucus will be attending. his home state. he is the key figure. he is part of the gang of six a bipartisan group, three republicans, lee democrats trying to negotiate in the senate a compromise deal. so a key figure. bill: polling shows a drop in the support of the healthcare reform bill. how is the white house reacting to that? >> we had a relevant poll out yesterday
a town hall meeting in montana. may be rowdier than the crowd in new hampshire earlier this week. usually they told signups on a web site. but tickets are being handed out on a first come first come basis. town halls have been heating up as you know all around the country this month. we will keep you potioned on what happens there secretary of state hillary clinton is wrapping up her trip to africa. this morning right now she is in cape verde day preparing to talk with nevez. she met with lie brotherrian leaders and spoke about democracy. >> there are no image wandz or i would have brought one for every one of you there are no quick fixes for countries making the transition from violent conflict to lasting peace and stability. alisyn: clinton toured seven african nation to bolster economic ties. brian: michael vick will try to resurrect his career with the eagles. he signed an option for a second year. the deal worth about $7 million. vick is backed in the league less than a month after being conditionally reinstated. following his prison term on dogfighting charges. so what do football f
. >> what else is he doing in montana? >> i hope that he will be enjoying the big sky country. i do not have any announcements on that today. at least i can lean on that side of it. >> i want to follow-up on what truck was asking. he is the top senator on the senate finance committee. the president wants a bipartisan bill. senator grassley said no public option. yesterday, he had a chance to clarify the death panel thing and he said that people have the right to be afraid of it. can you still count seriously chuck grassley as an ally in getting the health care bill passed? >> i think there's still the possibility of getting bipartisan agreement through the finance committee in order to make progress on a piece of legislation that can pass the senate. they're obviously the three republican senators who are involved in this. we hope to quell the misconceptions that apparently are held even by some in the senate. about what the bill is and what the bill is not. we will continue to hope that they can make progress. whether or not it happens, i do not know. >> he seems to be doing rope a dope wit
this week. he's holding another town hall meeting in bozeman, montana on friday and another in colorado on saturday. harry? >> kimberly dozier at the white house this morning, thank you. >>> senator arlen specter joins us now for an interview from state college, pennsylvania. senator, good morning. >> guaranteood morning, harry. >> you've had several encounters with people very angry about certain proposals being talked about and being proposed to change health care in the united states. as you've had a chance to reflect on them, what do you think? >> well, it's more than health care, harry. i think there is a mood in america of anger. with so many people unemployed and so much bickering in washington, people are disgusted with the partisanship and with the fear of losing their health care, it all boils over. but i think one thing that has to be borne in mind, and you've got the commotion in the background, is that these people have a right to be organized. i'm not going to complain about the fact that they are organized. they have a right to do that and they have a right to speak. but
. the president plans to hold more in montana and new hampshire. the white house has a website to counter critics. >>> during the town hall, president obama says we have the aarp on board. the aarp which has 45 million members over 50 says not so fast here. the ceo says they have not endorsed any of the health care reform bill. aarp is launching a multi-million dollar advertising and organizing this to debunk myths pushed by health care reform critics. >>> fbi investigating this graffiti outside dave scott. the democratic lawmaker found a swastika spray painted on a sign outside his office yesterday. the congressman was recently involved in a heated debate over health care. he believes the two are connected here. the congressman says he's received hate mail, death threats and offensive faxes since the debate on health care began. >> there is bubbling up under this debate, unfortunately the overtones this presents of hate, racism, all these things, but we must have the resolve, hate, racism, this swastika cannot be the arbiter of this debate. >>> congressman scott is hosting a town hall meeting sa
of the house ways and means committee. congressman, welcome. i want to take you to montana. this is a town hall debate that the president had. listen to randy rathy, what he had to say. >> max baucus, our senator, has been locd up in a dark room there for months now trying to come up with some money to pay for these programs and we keep getting the bull. that's all we get is bull. you can't tell us how you're going to pay for this. you're saving here, you're saving over there. going to take a little money there, take a little money there. you have no money. the only way to ge that money is to raise our taxes. you said you wouldn't. max baucus says he doesn't want to put a bill out that will. but that's the only way you can do that. >> congressman, isn't he right? >> i can't believe that -- that our democracy is so fragile that people have no answer to a very serious problem would just try to create animosity and hatred rather than try to sit down and first find out what is the problem, how costly is it and what does it take in order to stop it. there's no question that almost everyone listening
hampshire. he then went from the east way up here into montana in the west. the president having another town hall out here. short sleeves out in the west. interesting, in montana, the president lost to john mccain, but just narrowly there. and when you get further west, you have increased skepticism about washington and about government spending and the role of government in health care. and the president wrapped up his week with a town hall in colorado out here in the conservative part of the state. this was a red state he turned blue in the election, but out in conservative grand junction, interesting in colorado, 17% of the state's residents lack health insurance. 9% are are on medicare. and 8.5% on medicaid. as we watch the president travel politically, many of his own allies, even some of his allies say, they are more and more skeptical he can get this bill this year. you share that skepticism? >> i don't. i think that the debate across the country is -- reflects the fact that americans care deeply about health care. it's the most personal issue to most folks. everyone has a loved
, for the administration, it is the first of three events out in montana and colorado later this week, and it's a process that they're trying to again somewhat uphill battle because again they wanted this done by now. they didn't want to have this battle going on in august, but it's still in full swing. david? >> drums on the outside of the town hall. nbc's ron allen. ron, thanks for the report. >>> and by the way, that protester with a gun that we mentioned, his name is william costrick. he will be a guest on "hardball" tonight with chris matthews. it's coming up one hour from now. -n >>> how is the insurance industry responding to attacks from the democrats. today is not the first day the presidents a accused the industry. he once accused insurers of abuses and record profits. nancy pelosi called them, quote, villains. a democratic organization is accusing the insurance industry of, quote, stirring up fear with false rumors. the head of a group that represents insurance companies says democratic lawmakers are not helping their case by vilifying the insurance industry. they say members of congress will
on the road for a town hall. where is he headed? >> he is going to bozeman, montana to a county where he carried by 1600 votes. they have voted twice for him -- for george bush in the past. there is some sense and that they want to get max baucus' attention by going there, and montana is ground zero for health care reform, because that is where he is from. we have already seen people lining up to get tickets to the event. bill: there is a gallup poll out today that says independent voters are moving in a certain way. 35% are more sympathetic to the views of the protesters, opposed to 16% who are less sympathetic. how are these numbers being received? >> in the briefing yesterday, we heard robert kids say that some people were somewhat disappointed that he did not get a tougher response in new hampshire. he constantly talked about the food fight of the debate and have cable news is feeding on this, but clearly from the gallup poll, independents are starting to become sympathetic with these people protesting. certainly not good in terms of public opinion. bill: thank you. megyn: do you rem
hall meeting. maybe they'll get it in montana, maybe they'll get it in colorado, but i do think they're trying to see if they can just put a period on this whole town hall mess that's going on with members of congress. >> chuck, as we move forward, i want to bring in angela bert-murray who has a question for, my guest co-host. >> town halls have been the president's strength and go to place when ents to get his message out to the people directly but what we're seeing is a lot of debate. how ready is the administration as he heads to montana? how ready is he to face people that aren't his typical fans? people that really are going to disrupt the process? can they handle that? >> well, i think two weeks ago, i would have said no. i think they were caught flat-footed, that the fight over health care had become, to borrow a phrase, i think chris matthews said it first, part of the culture wars. when something gets into the culture war aspect, i'm talking about god, gays and abortion those inflaming passions in the '90s and maybe in the early part of the 21st century, i think that isn't w
are determined in law by congress. host: does a general practitioner in montana get paid the same as one in new york city? guest: no, because part of the formula is supposed to account for the cost of maintaining a medical practice. about half of the physician fee is not based on what they take time, but what it costs to run their office or practice. rents in new york city are substantially higher than in montana. those differences are built into the formula. host: is that where the national coverage determination comes into play? guest: no, that coverage speaks specifically to what medical procedures for tests medicare will pay for. technology is changing. medical practice is changing. medicare like every other insurer must decide if and when it will pay for some new treatment or approach. historic late, in medicare most of those decisions were made initially at the local level by the carriers, the private companies who under contract to the government manage the program. each had a medical director and they in turn had advisory committees. when something you came along they would decide wheth
. same thing with health care. if you are in nebraska, montana , where mount -- where max baucus is from, iowa where chuck grassley is from. you are going to see these ads playing out much more. that is why the coverage on c- span is so great on this issue, including the videos that you have been getting from town halls. >host: let me ask you about senator baucus. he will be in attendance, although he will not be speaking at the town hall meeting in montana, and there's also a piece this morning in "the washinton post," how the deficit is playing in all this. senator baucus's role in the health-care debate, and also the deficit impact on the debate. guest: senator baucus is one of the keys to having any sort of a deal that will have republicans on board. if he can work with top republicans, senator grassley has said, as viewers know, the he will not make it one man deal. he agrees to a deal, it will be one that republicans can agree to. that is why republicans are watching so closely what will come out of german baucus' -- of chairman baucus' committee. it might be a little rowdier, a li
goes back on the road tomorrow to talk about health care. he will be in belgrade, montana, to talk about his plan to overhaul the nation's health- care system. on saturday, the first family plans to spend part of the day in yellowstone. afterward, president obama has to another forum in grand junction, colorado. white house officials have said that the trip is partly aimed at encouraging people to visit national parks, as well as to get out the message on health care. this morning, "washington journal" asked to be worse if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can -- a view is if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can. have the health care protests changed your mind? beginning with a call from sun city, fla. on the independent line. what is your thinking as an independent? caller: thanks for taking my call. it has changed my mind a bit. i think the american people would benefit by being a self- insured group, and i think it is nice that obama it is given a choice. what i would like to impress everyone with and this is very
-- >> sitting in an air hangar in montana. look, we remember -- >> i'm wondering how you get the bureaucracy of health care whether it is private property or government barack receipts. >> we don't want the government make health care decisions for doctors and individuals, and the president doesn't believe health insurance companies should make those determinations either. when they decide that you are too sick or when they decide -- i'm sure you could go on the air right now and get 100 viewers to call in that have dealt with their insurance company and found that it had to go through extra paperwork because our original the treatment was denied, or some extra hurdle was put in place that they had to jump over in order to receive the treatment they deserved. that shouldn't happen -- what in the world is that? [laughter] life like i am, like, never mind. i'm not going to go -- [laughter] those decisions should be made role that the private insurance company currently has on health care, that seems to suggest those bureaucrats would still be there. >> well, i don't know who administers box's
returns to the town hall stage tomorrow in montana. now, ali velshi has been on the road all week long holding his own version of the town hall meeting listening to what people are saying about health care reform and he's not running for office. not trying to keep his seat. he's just in search of real people with real concerns. ali's found his way to sedalia, missouri, not too far from kansas city. ali, from your perspective in talking to folks on the road trip, how effective are these town halls? what do you think? >> reporter: well, everybody's heard of them or seen them. it has been the talk of the week. in fact, we've been talking to people about the economy all week generally, but somehow every conversation makes its way back to health care. and i think people have been influenced by them in some fashion because they've heard things being said. they've heard people talking about the government lying or the fact that it will be government control or they won't have choices about their doctors. or their health care. there's definitely been -- there have been things that have been pi
? >> of course. i like my life. >> in montana and colorado, those states were presidential battlegrounds. now they are the front lines for health care reform. >> thanks so much. we have seep and heard the anger and frustration. we have heard the insults being thrown around. but through all the shouting, is the message getting through? does the president have to explain that he won't pull the plug on grandma? that is what he was saying yesterday. our panel of experts weighs in. >> and a u.s. army private under arrest this morning accused of being a krablgt killer. the 18-year-old soldier is one of three men charged with murdering a cartel member who was also a dea informant. we are live in dallas this morning. what makes this so shocking, ed, is that this fellow was allegedly working for a cartel on the mexican side of the border but the hit was on the american side of the border. >> a chilling example of the power, influence, and reach of the mexican drug cartel. there is a growing concern that the reach might be beginning to corrupt u.s. officials, authorities,or people working along the bor
'll also speak this week at town halls in montana and grand junction, colorado. >>> update on a high-speed car chase we brought you just moments ago. lasted about an hour. started about 11:45 eastern time in the upper san fernando valley. a blue honda swerving in and out of lanes driving the wrong way on surface streets going very erratically. the car finally slowed down and as you'll see in a moment, it went into a driveway and that's where police with weapons drawn boxed him in. officers pulled in and pulled the driver out. the suspect was arrested and here is the take down. he had his hands up, but he would not comply with orders to get out, apparently. so, first one officer and then the second move in and pull him out. this chase apparently started after the driver failed to yield. >>> the kennedy family is in mourning and for the death of eunice kennedy shriver, the sister of john f. kennedy died this morning. she founded the special olympics. her daughter was by her side at a massachusetts hospital. she was 88 years old. shriver's son-in-law, california governor arnold schwarze
to montana he may be teaming up with max baucus. >> cnn is staying on top this was. this is a make or break month. what kind of special coverage can we expect to see? >> we'll be covering as many of these town halls as possible with our reporters, our producers, our photojournalists. we're gassing up the cnn campaign buss firing it up and ali velshi will start down your way. >> he's not driving? >> i hope not. keep him away from the wheel. he's going from atlanta up to iowa through parts of the south and midwest speaking to americans about how they feel about health care reform. >> i love those road trips because you get a slice of what people across the country feel about the issues that are on table and right now the number one issue being health care. thank you, paul, we do appreciate it. >> ali driving that bus is not a good thing. >> isn't that frightening. if you see ali on the roadway get off the side an let him go by. >> reynolds wolf was on the road. doing some investigating reporting. one man's trash is another man's treasure. reynolds wolf shows us how these electric lines have h
and montana but he seems to be losing the message war. is it time to effectively retreat on the public option question and get through some kind of health care reform that perhaps does include a public option? >> absolutely, absolutely. not. as a matter of fact, the insurance companies got a head start and a jump with us. they went up with their ads. they did a great job of convincing many people that somehow the government was going to take over and was going to be too expensive, it was not the thing to do, and so they got a jump. they got a head start but now we begin to fight back and you will see those polls change because people don't know absolutely what a government option is, what that means. we've got to define it. we've got to keep talking about it. we've got to help the american people to understand that the insurance companies have basically taken advantage of the american people. we have 47 million people without insurance. but more than that, the cost of the premiums have increased tremendously over the past several years. more profits for the insurance companies. the top ten ce
to have a more open debate, would you consider, for example, in montana, giving the republican congress -- >> i think the president feels very comfortable with the fact these having a representative discussion despite people's disappointment, that he wasn't yelled at. >> i don't doubt that if you look at the protests that we saw outside of the building yesterday, as a continuum from the t.e.a. parties and controversy over the birth certificate and some of the anger over the gates/crowley episode, i wonder -- >> let me just -- i go in the front door. i -- i don't doubt that but i'm saying -- i didn't see a representative sample the science. >> this is a president who campaigned on the notion that we could get beyond the partisan -- the ugly partisan warfare of the last 60 years. there could be, you know, rational discussion that could bring parties together. and i wonder what happened to that, why did the postpartisan presidency not materialize? >> jonathan, again, i -- i don't know if you were outside or inside, but i think there was a rational discussion about issues not based on ideol
the government option and the government spending. then out to montana, john mccain carried this state. the president more casual out west. out here, john mccain won, but just narrowly. getting further west, as you always know, there's more skepticism about the role of government and government spending. lastly the president before taking a break, was down in colorado for a town hall. he carried this state, but his message was delivered out in the grand junction area which is conservative country out here. 17% of the residents of colorado are uninsured. as we watch the president make his case, one thing he said in colorado was don't get so f fixated on this so-called public option. i would like one in there, but people are getting hung up on that, and there are other thicks to talk about. we could say we hold these truths to be self-evident. it's clear he doesn't have the votes in the senate. is he sending a message? >> it does sound that way. the president has held pretty fast to the notion of a public option. time and time again, when you press the white house as to whether or not th
care and health reform joining from us montana. senator, the dream that would never die included passing health reform. what is the likelihood of having that happen? you've been involved in all the key negotiations. >> ironically, i think the spirit and passion of ted's will be even stronger now. his passing is unfortunate but i think that's the case. i've never known a more effective legislator. i think ted kennedy is the great aent most effective legislator in modern american times. he was so passionate and worked so hard, a gifted speaker but then he would sit down and work out an agreement and compromise. and realize, okay. there was two sides of this. let's figure out how to get this passed. and the personal touch. we all know personal stories of ted and a very small one in my case, i was home one night and my mother was there and ted and my mother got the into this long, wonderful conversation and pretty soon became good pen pals. ted would write thank you notes to people. in this internet age nobody writes thank you notes but ted did. it was amazing how many people he did
in new hampshire, colorado and montana, states where the president is selling his plan this week, trying to reverse growing dissatisfaction over health care reform that showed up in polls of his own popularity. and with me now to talk about the president assess president obama's term in office so far are two editorial page editors, nolan finley of the "detroit news" and john diaz of the "san francisco chronicle," and two columnists, cynthia tucker of the "atlanta journal constitution" and robert robb of the "arizona republic." john >> john diaz, we have the president pushing back. what do you see going on? has he lost ground on health care? >> he has lost ground, and the thing i would say the president was trying to do today, very wisely in my opinion is reshape this debate, because although we are talking about somewhere in the neighborhood of 50 million people who don't have insurance in this country, the fact remains, the vast majority of americans do have coverage and that's really the audience he was going after today, because the thing the president has to persuade them that this i
again for this weekend for two town hall meetings, first on friday in bolton, montana, then saturday in grand junction, colorado. wolf? >> he's going to be busy at both those meetings and other stops, as well. thanks very much, dan lothian. jack cafferty has "the cafferty file." jack? >>> there is another view of this, of course. when it comes to town hall meetings, the democrats might want to rethink their strategy. arlen specter and claire mccaskill are the latest to be drowned out by protesters. one woman in missouri told mccaskill, quote, if they don't let us vent our frustrations out, they will have a revolution, unquote. protesters at arlen specter's meeting said they think the obama administration is going too far with health care reform. one woman shouted out, quote, this is about dismantling this country. specter said he thinks the people proetsdsing are, quote, not necessarily representative of america, but he thinks they should be heard. president obama and the democrats seem to face an increasingly uphill battle with selling health care reform to a skeptical public. peopl
. it is just killing me. -- it is just killing the construction business. i worked in oregon and montana, and i come here in a right to work state and making what i did back in the 1980's because of all of the illegals here. you have been fighting -- every step of the way. the whole thing, the police chief of phoenix, he is a democrat and he won't let his officers ask if they are illegal or whatever. host: we will have to live there. mayor gordon, a sharp response? guest: number one, i did not know what the chief police -- he is a professional and recognized, the most respected -- most respected. no. two, with inviting the issues. number three, the officers have a policy that is supported, in fact a model for the country. the other agencies have done it, when it is appropriate, and not based on race but a violation of law as to the legal status. and they arrest. again, i think there is a lot of misunderstanding and unfortunately individuals like the sheriff had targeted people because of the color of their skin. i don't know how you determine whether it individuals are legal or illegal because
heads to new hampshire for a town hall meeting on health care, later montana, home of senator baucus, a key democrat trying to negotiate a deal on health care reform. >> thank you so much. in the piece you heard david scott prom the doctor who spoke in the town hall forum if he wanted a meeting he could have one. both men got a chance to have their say last night on newsroom. >> these individuals have a right to come and express their opinion but this must be done in a very deliberate manner. this is a very complex issue. i have a health care meeting. i have a health care event every year. this was something that was orchestrated. this gentleman came there to hijack this meeting that was not about health care, and that's why i was very concerned. >> i want to talk about health care. i feel like we really need to stop doing all these distractions. this is a democracy and we need to be able to come together as adults and people with ideas and to be able to express our ideas back and forth. that's how a democracy is supposed to work. coming in and screaming and hollering and being strup
hampshire, and friday in montana, and saturday in grand junction, colorado. a white house official said that participants would not be screened to keep out opponents. here is the front page of "the baltimore sun" -- noisy disbelief, opponents dominate the town hall meeting on health care. the center is heckled throughout the session. one of our video journalists was their last night. we will show you the full town meeting this evening at 8:00 p.m., but in this article in the baltimore paper -- they began arriving four hours early, ignoring triple digit heat index levels for a chance to holler at and senator benjamin cardin's town hall meeting. he was heckled almost non-stop. the audience jeered his answers and broken to raucous cheers when their comrades confronted the center with this massive remarks. the baltimore paper's article goes on to say that many in the crowd laughed uproariously when cardin said that illegal immigrants would not be entitled to coverage under the democratic plan. they jumped to their feet in one of the loudest ovations of the night after an audience member ask
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